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  • 1.
    Roysdon, Emily
    University of Arts, Crafts and Design, Department of Fine Art.
    Collective Consciousness2016In: Artforum International, ISSN 1086-7058, E-ISSN 1098-3376, Vol. 54, no 10, p. 266-277Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The article presents a roundtable discussion on identity and art, with artists, art critics and scholars, including artist Emily Roysdon, film theorist Kara Keeling and periodical editor Michelle Kuo, among others. Topics discussed by the panelists include the status of identity politics in the 21st century, the disconnect between pedagogical understanding of identity and the social acceptance of the concept and the ways in which identity and identity politics are being represented in art.

  • 2.
    Roysdon, Emily
    University of Arts, Crafts and Design, Department of Fine Art.
    Ecstatic Resistance2013In: Reading / Feeling / [ed] Tanja Baudoin, Frédérique Bergholtz, Vivian Ziherl, Amsterdam: If I Can’t Dance, I Don’t Want To Be Part Of Your Revolution , 2013Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Reading / Feeling examines affect, a term that delineates a field where the personal and political meet in sensory movements between bodies. A pre-emotional experience, affect constitutes the social and economic relationships that make up the fabric of society. Reading / Feeling considers the meaning of affect in theory and artistic practice through texts by theoreticians, artists, and curators read in If I Can’t Dance’s Reading Groups in Amsterdam, Toronto, and Sheffield as part of the programme for Edition IV – Affect (2010–12). It also includes three new essays, short statements by Reading Group members, and artist pages.

  • 3.
    Roysdon, Emily
    University of Arts, Crafts and Design, Department of Fine Art.
    Ecstatic Resistance2013In: Abstraction / [ed] Maria Lind, Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2013, p. 222-225Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Part of the acclaimed Documents of Contemporary Art series of anthologies which collect writing on major themes and ideas in contemporary art.

     This anthology reconsiders crucial aspects of abstraction's resurgence in contemporary art, exploring three equally significant modes or strategies explored in current practice: formal abstraction, economic abstraction and social abstraction. In the 1960s movements as diverse as Latin American neo-concretism, op art and 'eccentric abstraction' disrupted the homogeneity, universality and rationality associated with abstraction, opening up new forms of engagement with the phenomenal world and the possibility of diverse readings of the same forms, ranging from formalist and transcendental to socio-economic and conceptual. A second discourse that emerges in the 1980s via the writing of Peter Halley, Fredric Jameson and others, engages with abstraction through the consideration of an increasingly abstracted world in terms of its economic, social and political conditions - all increasingly manifested through abstract codes or sites of style. Such economic abstraction is primarily addressed in art as a subject or theme, but in Deleuze and Guattari's notion of art as abstract machine possibilities emerge for art's role in the construction of a new kind of social reality. In more recent art a third strand emerges: a form of social abstraction centred on the strategy of withdrawal. Social abstraction implies stepping aside, a movement away from the mainstream, suggesting the possibilities for art to manoeuvre within self-organized, withdrawn initiatives in the field of cultural production.

  • 4.
    Roysdon, Emily
    University of Arts, Crafts and Design, Department of Fine Art.
    Emily Roysdon2018In: Is the living body the last thing left alive?: the new performance turn, its histories and its institutions / [ed] Cosmin Costinaș, Ana Janevski, Hong Kong: Para Site , 2018, p. 108-117Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Roysdon, Emily
    University of Arts, Crafts and Design, Department of Fine Art.
    Queer Love2016In: Queer / [ed] David J. Getsy, London: Whitechapel , 2016, p. 178-179Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    SummaryKey artists' writings that have influenced and catalyzed contemporary queer artistic practice.

    Historically, “queer” was the slur used against those who were perceived to be or made to feel abnormal. Beginning in the 1980s, “queer” was reappropriated and embraced as a badge of honor. While queer draws its politics and affective force from the history of non-normative, gay, lesbian, and bisexual communities, it is not equivalent to these categories, nor is it an identity. Rather, it offers a strategic undercutting of the stability of identity and of the dispensation of power that shadows the assignment of categories and taxonomies. Artists who identify their practices as queer today call forth utopian and dystopian alternatives to the ordinary, adopt outlaw stances, embrace criminality and opacity, and forge unprecedented kinships, relationships, loves, and communities.

    Rather than a book of queer theory for artists, this is a book of artists' queer tactics and infectious concepts. By definition, there can be no singular “queer art.” Here, in the first Documents of Contemporary Art anthology to be centered on artists' writings, numerous conversations about queer practice are brought together from diverse individual, social and cultural contexts. Together these texts describe and examine the ways in which artists have used the concept of queer as a site of political and institutional critique, as a framework to develop new families and histories, as a spur to action, and as a basis from which to declare inassimilable difference.

  • 6.
    Roysdon, Emily
    University of Arts, Crafts and Design, Department of Fine Art.
    Snorkeling: Wynne Greenwood and Emily Roysdon in conversation2015In: Wynne Greenwood: Stacy ... Kelly / [ed] Stephanie Snyder, New York: Cooley Gallery and New Museum , 2015Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 7.
    Roysdon, Emily
    University of Arts, Crafts and Design, Institutionen för Konst (K).
    Uncounted *2015In: Radical Re Re Re Re Re Rethinking / [ed] Maria Lantz, Staffan Lundgren, Stockholm: Konstfack / University College of Arts, Crafts & Design , 2015, 1 uppl., p. 50-59Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Roysdon, Emily
    University of Arts, Crafts and Design, Institutionen för Konst (K).
    Uncounted: Call & Response2015Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    UNCOUNTED: Call & Responseedited by Kristin PoorPublished by SecessionDistribution: Revolver Verlag click

    UNCOUNTED: Call & Response is a collaborative artists’ book, which takes the form of a call and response: Roysdon’s twenty-three part text UNCOUNTED provides the impetus and prompt for responses from the twenty-three artists, writers, poets, and scholars whose wide-ranging contributions are gathered here. UNCOUNTED has also been used a script for live performances; some of the responses included in this volume arose from these performative situations. Between Roysdon’s text and the collected responses lies the opportunity to unfold, create dissonance, point elsewhere, and write into. It is an improvisation of a publication. 

    UNCOUNTED engages a vocabulary of movement, margins, and trespass. It is about what is “unseen in time,” alive time in institutions, and the politics of transitions. Drawing on texts by W.H. Auden, David Hammons, Gertrude Stein, and Elizabeth Grosz, among others, Roysdon considers “uncounted experience,” what is “beyond the will to measure,” posing such questions to her interlocutors as “What is time if not activism?” “Can we support collectivities instead of collections?” and “What instruments have we?” 

    The artists’ book is published in conjunction with the exhibition Emily Roysdon at the Secession.

    Contributions by Emily Roysdon and Marwa Arsanios, Doug Ashford, Babi Badalov, Morgan Bassichis, Gregg Bordowitz, Pauline Boudry / Renate Lorenz, Jaime Shearn Coan, Moyra Davey, Michelle Dizon, Grace Dunham, Celeste Dupuy-Spencer, Corrine Fitzpatrick, Miguel Gutierrez, Raquel Gutiérrez, Elisabeth Lebovici, André Lepecki, Robin Coste Lewis, Heather Love, MPA, Ridykeulous, Jen Rosenblit, Sarah Schulman, and Martine Syms. 

    Berlin 2015, 96 pages, ill., 32 x 23 cm, Softcover, hand-sewed spine, English

  • 9.
    Roysdon, Emily
    et al.
    University of Arts, Crafts and Design, Department of Fine Art.
    Arakistain, Xabier
    Are we still trespassing?: A trans-Atlantic conversation between Emily Roysdon and Xabier Arakistain2015In: Otherwise: Imagining queer feminist art histories / [ed] Amelia Jones, Erin Silver, Manchester, UK: Manchester University Press, 2015Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Otherwise: Imagining queer feminist art histories is the first book to address queer feminist politics, methods and theories in relation to the visual arts, including new media, installation and performance art. Despite the crucial contribution of considerations of 'queer' to feminism in other disciplines of the humanities and the strong impact of feminist art history on queer visual theory, a visible and influential queer feminist art history has remained elusive. This book fills the gap by providing a range of chapters by key North American and European scholars, both emerging and established, who address the historiographic and political questions arising from the relationship between art history and queer theory in order to help map exclusions and to offer models of a new queer feminist art historical or curatorial approach.

  • 10.
    Hughes, Every Ocean (Artist, Creator)
    University of Arts, Crafts and Design, Department of Fine Art.
    Beyond the Will to Measure2017Artistic output (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Hughes, Every Ocean (Artist, Creator)
    University of Arts, Crafts and Design, Department of Fine Art.
    Emily Roysdon2017Artistic output (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Hughes, Every Ocean (Artist, Creator)
    University of Arts, Crafts and Design, Department of Fine Art.
    Emily Roysdon2017Artistic output (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Hughes, Every Ocean
    University of Arts, Crafts and Design, Department of Fine Art.
    Every Ocean Hughes2019Artistic output (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Hughes, Every Ocean (Artist, Creator)
    University of Arts, Crafts and Design, Department of Fine Art.
    Self, Colin (Contributor, Creator, Composer)
    Wyeth, Geo (Contributor, Creator, Artist)
    Wilner, Bryce (Contributor, Creator)
    Help the Dead2019Artistic output (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Hughes, Every Ocean (Artist, Creator)
    University of Arts, Crafts and Design, Department of Fine Art.
    One Big Bag2021Artistic output (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Hughes, Every Ocean (Artist, Creator)
    University of Arts, Crafts and Design, Department of Fine Art.
    scenic, say2017Artistic output (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Hughes, Every Ocean (Artist, Creator)
    University of Arts, Crafts and Design, Department of Fine Art.
    Sense and Sense2017Artistic output (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Hughes, Every Ocean (Artist, Creator)
    University of Arts, Crafts and Design, Department of Fine Art.
    Uncounted (performance 9)2017Artistic output (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Hughes, Every Ocean (Artist, Creator)
    University of Arts, Crafts and Design, Department of Fine Art.
    What instruments have we?2017Artistic output (Refereed)
1 - 19 of 19
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