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  • 1.
    Avila, Martin
    University of Arts, Crafts and Design, Department of Design, Interior Architecture and Visual Communication (DIV), Industrial Design.
    Design responses as response diversity2017In: La Vie À L'Oeuvre / Life at Work: Nouvelles Écologies, Bioart, Biodesign / Towards New Ecologies / [ed] Perig Pitrou, Paris, 2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This talk addresses the use of the ecological notion of response diversity (Elmqvist Et al. 2003) as a frame to develop coupled natural-artificial systems. It does so through the practice of design, making explicit the type of performativity that design proposals could enact by devising complementary responses designed to support the life of specific beings in specific ecosystems. The talk elaborates upon examples from the project Dispersal machines, part of my postdoctoral research entitled Symbiotic tactics and financed by the Swedish Research Council (2013-2016). Dispersal machines proposes two complementary artificial systems that attempt to minimise the damages by a moth (Spodoptera frugiperda) on crops (corn and soy predominantly) in the agroecosystems of Córdoba, Argentina. The proposals attempt to biologically control this species by interventions that disseminate and/or host species that predate or parasitize the moth at different stages of its life cycle: a diurnal response, based on the dissemination of parasitized eggs of the moth by a tiny wasp (Telenomus remus), as well as a nocturnal response, based on the placement of bat refuges that feed on the adult moth.

  • 2.
    Avila, Martin
    University College of Arts, Crafts and Design, Department of Design, Interior Architecture and Visual Communication (DIV), Industrial Design.
    Ecologizing, Decolonizing: An Artefactual Perspective2017In: NORDES 2017: DESIGN + POWER, 2017, Vol. 7Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper I present a design project developed in Córdoba, Argentina, entitled ‘Spices-Species’. Through this case study, I discuss the possibility of designing using two decolonial strategies —"objectivity (or truth) in parenthesis" and " being where one does and thinks"— that can lead to delinking, on a micropolitical scale, from colonial social patterns as well as reconnecting humans with natural processes and beings to which they are detached by means of devices. The paper suggests that these decolonial strategies, combined with the performance of designed artefacts may help to acknowledge not only human diversity, but also the multiple and diverse nonhuman beings that conform and participate in different localities.

  • 3.
    Avila, Martin
    University of Arts, Crafts and Design, Department of Design, Interior Architecture and Visual Communication (DIV), Industrial Design.
    Responding through design2018In: Semotics of Hybrid Natures: Anthropogenic Ecosystems, Multimodalities, Transformed Umwelts / [ed] Silver Rattasepp, Tartu, Estonia, 2018, p. 14-15Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The presentation “Responding through design” addresses the use of the ecological notion of response diversity (Elmqvist Et al. 2003) as a frame to develop naturecultures. It does so by focusing on the practice of design, making explicit the type of performativity that design proposals could enact by devising complementary responses designed to support the life of specific beings in specific ecosystems. The talk elaborates upon examples from the project Dispersal machines, part of my postdoctoral research entitled Symbiotic tactics and financed by the Swedish Research Council (2013-2016). Dispersal machines proposes two complementary artificial systems that attempt to minimise the damages by a moth (Spodoptera frugiperda) on crops (corn and soy predominantly) in the agroecosystems of Córdoba, Argentina. The proposals attempt to biologically control this species by interventions that disseminate and/or host species that predate or parasitize the moth at different stages of its life cycle: a diurnal response, based on the dissemination of parasitized eggs of the moth by a tiny wasp (Telenomus remus), as well as a nocturnal response, based on the placement of bat refuges that feed on the adult moth.

     

    Interspecies care demands response-ability (Haraway 2016); the challenges being the development of a practice of design tuned to respond dynamically to multi-scalar phenomena and multi-species abilities. Addressing the “semiotics of hybrid natures”, the presentation reflects upon “abilities to respond” and the notion of semethic interaction (Hoffmeyer 2008) as it relates to the more general semiotic term, semiosphere. With this context in mind, it addresses pattern-making through design, co-evolutionary possibilities, and the human capacity to respond through design, and design as a form of response. 

  • 4.
    Avila, Martin
    et al.
    HDK (School of crafts and design) Gothenburg University.
    Carpenter, John
    Mazé, Ramia
    Interactive Insitute Sweden.
    3Ecologies: Visualizing Sustainability Factors and Futures2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ‘3Ecologies’ makes visible factors affecting the sustainability of consumer products. Within engineering and economics, there are a variety of models for analyzing and ‘predicting’ the environmental factors such as energy, emissions and waste involved during production, consumption and disposal. We develop an expanded model, which emphasizes human impact and choices as well as potential consequences and futures. Psychological, sociological and environmental factors are mapped over time – throughout the lifespan (production, purchase, use, and disposal) and the extended lifecycle(s) of products. Case studies of familiar products in everyday life are developed to demonstrate the conceptual model, and three applications are proposed to reach designers, consumers and the general public. 3Ecologies uses diagrams and narratives to visualize the history and possible futures of products, including natural disintegration, active recycling and unexpected adaptations – an alternative view upon the ‘life’ of things that we might ordinarily take for granted

  • 5.
    Ávila, Martín
    University College of Arts, Crafts and Design, The Department of Design, Crafts and Art (DKK).
    Causes of evil and (wonder) A design enquiry2015In: Radical Re Re Re Re Re Rethinking / [ed] Maria Lantz, Staffan Lundgren, Stockholm: Konstfack / University College of Arts, Crafts & Design , 2015, 1 uppl., p. 108-115Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Ávila, Martín
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Devices: On Hospitality, Hostility and Design2012Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis studies and speculates upon the interrelations of artefacts with human and nonhuman agents. These interrelations form assemblages, some of which have emergent properties, becoming manifestations of processes that we cannot fully control or understand. The work started by exploring the theme of hospitality and hostility with the ambition to better understand the ecological complexity of the design process and its results. As an assemblage, this work combines different literary, philosophical and theoretical discourses and traditions with experimental design in order to develop and articulate the concept of device. A device organizes, arranges, frames our environment and thereby defines and limits possibilities of relation. Since relations can only be thought through a so-called natural language such as English, they must be taken into consideration through the process of languaging, understood by Humberto Maturana and Francisco Varela as communication about communication”, and as the most characteristic feature of the human species. My focusing on linguistic and biological phenomena is a response to this concern, in an attempt to understand how this process influences our perception of the world. Through a series of design projects, the thesis examines the potential range of an artefact’s relations. It does so by exploring grammatical associations that affect design onceptualizations, creating tools (prepositiontools) as well as studying and articulating forms of symbiosis that an artefact might develop in and with its environment (¡Pestes!).

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