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  • 1.
    Homlong, Siri
    University College of Arts, Crafts and Design, Institutionen för Bildpedagogik (BI).
    Colours in Amish Quilts2015In: Proceedings of AIC 2014 - Interim Meeting: Color, Culture and Identity: Past, Present and Future / [ed] Georgina Ortiz, Citlali Ortiz, Rodrigo Ramírez., Mexico City: AMEXINC , 2015, p. 141-147Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Amish religious movement have its roots in the Protestant Reformation in the 16th century. The Amish people are anabaptists and have strict rules for their way of life. They were persecuted in Europe and Amish groups emigrated to Pennsylvania. Today the most traditional part of the movement – the Old Amish People – lives in Lancaster County west of Philadelphia, USA. This paper describs a study of the colours in Old Amish Quilts, traditional Amish patchwork quilts used as bed covers. The patches are single-coloured fabric pieces forming clear symmetrical patterns with deep and strong colours. The quilts are important in Amish culture; they are made for the bride’s wedding chest. Nowadays traditional Amish quilts also are made for turists as wall decorations – “wallhangings”.

    The selection of quilts for my survey consists of five Old Amish Quilts from Lancaster Heritage Museum and The American Quilt Study Group, 15 quilts, at that time, belonging to The Esprit Collection and eight new quilts with traditional patterns (wallhangings). The colour analysis was carried out using Natural Colour System (NCS) with the aim of identifying general principles for selection of colours.

    The analysis shows that most hues are located in the lower part of the colour circle ・from red (R) to green (G), and most nuances - with relatively high degree of blackness or chromaticness - in the lower part of the colour triangle. Colour choice is often dependent on moral or religious preferences. For example, in quilts from Lancaster County, yellowish colours are - as representing ・hochmut・ (arrogance) - regarded as bad colour choice.

    The strong colours in Old Amish Quilts have no counterpart in public life. In Lancaster county Amish people wear black, brown and dark blue clothes and their wagons are black; colourfulness is restricted to the bedrooms and the private sphere.

  • 2.
    Homlong, Siri
    University College of Arts, Crafts and Design, Institutionen för Bildpedagogik (BI).
    Like or dislike: aesthetic judgements on textile patterns2013In: Proceedings from the 2nd International Conference for Design Education Researchers, 14-17 May 2013, Oslo, Norway / [ed] Janne Beate Reitan, Peter Lloyd, Erik Bohemia, Liv Merete Nielsen Ingvild Digranes and Eva Lutnaes, 2013, p. 731-742Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In different areas of handicraft and textile production, teachers, researchers, purchasers and others have to judge products based on different factors such as function, aesthetics, taste and so on. The whole process of designing – from ideas and visions to finished product – includes aesthetic judgements: In the first planning phase, several sketches are made that can later be changed, adjusted and further developed. When a product is finished, further judgements are needed: designers and artisans evaluate the result of their efforts, teachers judge the works of pupils or students and purchasers or consumers judge the suitability of the textile based on their particular needs. Because different persons make different choices when making or buying a textile product, it is interesting to study people’s experiences of fabrics as well as their reasons for making certain aesthetic judgments. This article presents a study of judgments and values expressed when designed printed fabrics were displayed for designers, teachers of textile crafts, consumers and schoolchildren. The present study shows that subjects make their judgements on the basis of formal, functional, cultural and emotional contents. These aspects should therefore be in focus in design work and design education.

     

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