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  • 1.
    Kristoffersson, Sara
    University of Arts, Crafts and Design, The Department of Design, Crafts and Art (DKK).
    Swedish Design History2011In: Journal of Design History, ISSN 0952-4649, E-ISSN 1741-7279, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 197-199Article, book review (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Scandinavian Design became a world-famous concept and brand in the 1950s. In numerous exhibitions, publications and commercial ventures, Scandinavia was portrayed as a regional and cultural entity comprising democratic and socially responsible model states with a common aesthetic: an elegant, low-key and restrained design without decorative excesses often realized in natural materials. This purported homogeneity has been greatly exaggerated in the literature on Swedish and Scandinavian design. It was certainly a commercially successful image, but not particularly true to life.

    This is observed by Lasse Brunnström in his Swedish Design History, in which he attempts to demonstrate that the history of Swedish design is far more variegated than is usually portrayed.

  • 2.
    Kristoffersson, Sara
    University of Arts, Crafts and Design, Department of Design, Interior Architecture and Visual Communication (DIV).
    The HI-group and the Return to Craft: Swedish Furniture and Interiors 1960–19662019In: Journal of Design History, ISSN 0952-4649, E-ISSN 1741-7279, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 217-218Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Peach, Andrea
    University of Arts, Crafts and Design, Department of Crafts (KHV), Ceramics & Glass.
    Highland Romance or Viking Saga? The Contradictory Branding of Orkney Tweed in the Twentieth Century2019In: Journal of Design History, ISSN 0952-4649, E-ISSN 1741-7279, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 263-279Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Few have heard of Orkney tweed today, but in the mid-twentieth century it was as well known as Harris Tweed, and praised for its soft and light characteristics. This article investigates the rise and fall of Orkney tweed and suggests that its decline in the 1960s can be attributed to a variety of factors, including the advent of synthetic, ready-to-wear clothing, but also problems inherent in the mixed marketing messages around the textile. While the main producers of Orkney tweed emphasised the Viking connections of the Orkney islands and their product, the fashion media and overseas customers were more comfortable with positioning Orkney tweed within a stereotypic context of Scottish romanticism, in which Orkney tweed became interchangeable – and replaceable - with all Scottish tweeds. Contemporary attempts to re-establish tweed production on the Orkney Islands have rejected both approaches, focusing instead on the ‘natural’ properties of the fabric and the production of easily portable souvenirs.

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  • 4.
    Zetterlund, Christina
    University of Arts, Crafts and Design, Department of Crafts (KHV).
    Designkulturanalyser: Anders V.  Munch, Niels Peter  Skou & Toke Riis  Ebbesen(eds). University Press of Southern Denmark, 20152017In: Journal of Design History, ISSN 0952-4649, E-ISSN 1741-7279, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 95-97Article, book review (Other academic)
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